Sioux Falls AFL-CIO

 

On May 7, while recovering from an illness, Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) International President Larry Hanley died suddenly.  In a brief statement, his family,

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The new NAFTA is another corporate handout. It won't stem the outsourcing of good jobs or protect the rights of working people. Tell Congress the new NAFTA isn't good enough.

Recently introduced legislation would provide needed protections for health care and social services workers from violence on the job. Tell Congress to support an OSHA workplace violence standard.

Recent News

WORKING PEOPLE, WOMEN'S AND CIVIL RIGHTS ACTIVISTS, RELIGIOUS LEADERS, ENVIRONMENTALISTS AND LABOR UNIONS ANNOUNCE NATIONWIDE WORKING PEOPLE'S DAY OF ACTION

Tens of thousands of people plan actions to honor Dr. King’s fight for basic freedom for sanitation workers and protest the rigged economy, just days before Supreme Court will hear case meant to attack working people

South Dakota Workers come together to Condemn the South Dakota Legislature over the So-Called "Right to Work" resolution aimed at disrespecting the working families of South Dakota,

I was raised in a company house, in a company town, where the miners had to buy their own oilers – that is, rubber coveralls – drill bits, and other tools at the company store.

That company, Inco Limited, the world’s leading producer of nickel for most of the 20th century, controlled the town of Sudbury, Ontario, but never succeeded in owning the souls of the men and women who lived and worked there.

That’s because these were union men and women: self-possessed, a little rowdy, and well aware that puny pleas from individual workers fall on deaf corporate ears.

A year after a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling that threatened to cripple public sector unions, they seem to be holding their own.

Government employees, it turns out, see value in belonging to unions. Membership in Illinois government unions actually has increased a year after the June 27, 2018, ruling in Janus vs. AFSCME, as Sun-Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet reported in a recent column.